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Experts

Scott Allard

Scott Allard

Associate Professor in the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago

Expertise: Financial crisis, social service agencies, nonprofits, poverty and inequality, social welfare policy, government policy
Events: Thursday, April 7, 2011, Places in Need: The Changing Geography of Poverty in the U.S.

Scott Allard is a leading expert on poverty and services to the poor, as well as the financial crisis in social service agencies and nonprofits. He has recently completed two surveys of more than 2,000 governmental and nonprofit social service providers in seven urban and rural communities. He is the author of Out of Reach: Place, Poverty, and the New American Welfare State (2008), which explores the accessibility and stability of social service agencies serving low-income populations in urban America.

Prior to his faculty position at the University of Chicago, Allard was an assistant professor in the Department of Public Administration at the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University and an assistant professor of Political Science and Public Policy at Brown University. Allard has been a Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Urban Scholar, as well as a visiting scholar at the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan, the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin, the Institute for Policy Research at Northwestern University, and the University of Kentucky Center for Poverty Research. He received his PhD in political science from the University of Michigan.

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Evelyn Brodkin

Evelyn Z. Brodkin

Associate Professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration and Lecturer at the Law School

Expertise: Bureaucracy, policy implementation, politics of the welfare state, public policy, social politics, public management, contracting, policy delivery, accountability, welfare policy and administration, welfare reform
Events: Thursday, June 9, 2011, Poverty, Inequality, and the Role of Government: Politics, Practices, and Possibilities

Evelyn Z. Brodkin is an Associate Professor in the School of Social Service Administration and Lecturer in the Law School at the University of Chicago. In addition, she is a Faculty Affiliate at the Northwestern University/University of Chicago’s Joint Center for Poverty Research, a national and interdisciplinary academic research center that seeks to advance understanding of what it means to be poor in America. Her fields of special interest include social politics, poverty policy, politics of the welfare state, and street-level bureaucracy.

Brodkin’s current research investigates changes in the American welfare state and, specifically, how public policies and institutions are reshaping the politics of poverty and social inclusion. She is codirector of the Project on the Public Economy of Work that aims to explain how welfare law and the structure of lower-wage work are creating a new public economy of work. She is on the steering committee of RESq (International Research Network on Reform of Employment Services), which brings together researchers around the world to develop and refine the comparative and theoretical study of policy and service reforms.

Brodkin received her PhD in political science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, an MPA from Northeastern University, and a BS in journalism from Boston University. She recently received the Herbert Kaufman Award for the best paper in public administration by the American Political Science Association.

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Chad Broughton

Chad Broughton

Senior Lecturer in Public Policy Studies and Faculty Director of the Chicago Studies Program at the University of Chicago

Expertise: Gender, labor, poverty, and welfare policy in the United States and Mexico
Courses: Oct. 6-27, 2011, Poverty and Promise in Chicago

Chad Broughton is a Senior Lecturer in the University of Chicago’s Public Policy Studies Program, and he is the faculty director of the University’s Chicago Studies Program. He was previously an assistant professor of sociology at Knox College, where he was the recipient of the 2005 Philip Green Wright Lombard College Teaching Award. In 2008, he won the University of Chicago’s Faculty Service Award.

Broughton’s current research includes undertaking ethnographic fieldwork in downstate Illinois, the U.S.-Mexican border, and rural southern Mexico to explore the ways changes in NAFTA have affected workers in these areas. He has authored several scholarly articles and reviews, including "Migration as Engendered Practice: Mexican Men, Masculinity, and Northward Migration" (2008) and "The World at the U.S.-Mexican Border" (2010). He is currently working on the book Bust, Boom, Exodus: Global Tales from the Rust Belt, a Border Boomtown, and the Mexican Campo.

He is a member of the American Sociological Association and the Society for the Study of Social Problems. He received his MA and PhD, both in sociology, at the University of Chicago.

Erika Dudley

Erika Dudley

Coordinator for Parent Education, the Odyssey Project, and Community Education for the Civic Knowledge Project at the University of Chicago

Expertise: Community development, adult literacy, welfare reform, workforce development
Courses: Summer-Autumn 2010, Poverty and the Humanities in Chicago

Erika Dudley is the coordinator for Parent Education, the Odyssey Project (a course in arts for those in poverty), and Community Education for the Civic Knowledge Project at the University of Chicago. She is an expert in community development and adult literacy.

She has taught as an instructor for English as a second language (ESL) courses and GED courses in Chicago. Her ESL instruction has included teaching international students health and literacy. She previously worked for STRIVE/Chicago Employment Service as a public policy advocate on issues such as welfare reform and workforce development, as the director of Career Advancement Technology Centers, and as director of the Career Path Project. Prior to moving to Chicago, Dudley worked in Oakland, California for the Center for Third World Organizing as a community and national organizer, and as the organization’s development and financial operations coordinator.

As a chef trained at Le Cordon Bleu in Paris, Dudley has worked at restaurants, bakeries, and catering services across the country. She received her AB in French history from Harvard College.

Julia Henly

Julia Henly

Associate Professor in the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago

Expertise: Family poverty, child care and welfare policy, work-family strategies of low-wage workers, informal support networks, employment discrimination
Events: Wednesday, May 25, 2011, Poverty, Underemployment and Family Hardship: The Realities of Today’s Labor Market for Chicago’s Families

Julia R. Henly is Associate Professor in the School of Social Service Administration and faculty affiliate of the University of Chicago Center for Human Potential and Public Policy. She was previously an assistant professor in the School of Public Policy and Social Research at the University of California at Los Angeles. Henly is a research affiliate of the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan and a member of the steering committee of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families’ Child Care Policy Research Consortium. Her fields of interest include family poverty, child care and welfare policy, work-family strategies of low-wage workers, informal support networks, and employment discrimination.

Among her various research initiatives, Henly is co-principal investigator (with S. Lambert) of the Scheduling Intervention Study, which aims to reduce work-family conflict and improve key employee and family outcomes. Professor Henly’s work has appeared in several peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Marriage and Family, Social Work Research, Children, and Youth Services Review; the Journal of Social Issues; and in several edited book volumes. She received her BA in psychology and social work from the University of Wisconsin at Madison and her MSW (policy and planning) and PhD in social work and social psychology from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.

Timothy Knowles

Timothy Knowles

John Dewey Director and Clinical Professor, the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute

Expertise: Urban schooling, human capital development, education innovations, applied research, school reform, school administration, teacher development
Events: Thursday, November 11, 2010, Poverty and Urban Schooling

Timothy Knowles serves as John Dewey Director of the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute (UEI), which aims to improve schooling in urban America through research, training, developing effective teaching tools, and operating a preK-12 charter school with four campuses in the South Side of Chicago. During his tenure at the University of Chicago, UEI has initiated the creation of 20 new schools across Chicago’s South Side.

Previously, Knowles served as deputy superintendent for Teaching and Learning at the Boston Public Schools. There he created two organizations devoted to building the pipeline of high-quality teachers and school leaders for Boston Public Schools, and he served as co-director of the Boston Annenberg Challenge, a nationally recognized effort to improve literacy instruction.

Before that, he founded and directed a full-service K-8 school in Bedford-Stuyvesant, New York City. He also served as the founding director of Teach for America in New York City and as a teacher of African History in Botswana. He has written and spoken extensively on the topics of school leadership, teacher quality, school reform, and accountability in public schools. He received his BA in anthropology and African history from Oberlin College and his MA and doctorate from the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

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Susan Lambert

Susan Lambert

Associate Professor in the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago

Expertise: Work-life integration, work-life benefits, lower-skilled jobs, low-wage workers, work connections, organizational stratification, organizational theory and management, shift work, workplace flexibility, work scheduling
Events: Wednesday, May 25, 2011, Poverty, Underemployment and Family Hardship: The Realities of Today’s Labor Market for Chicago’s Families

Susan Lambert is a faculty affiliate in the University’s Alfred P. Sloan Center on Parents, Children, and Families. She has published broadly on the issue of employment and worker well-being, co-editing a book with Ellen Kossek titled Work and Life Integration: Organizational, Cultural, and Individual Perspectives (2005). Other recent publications include “Nonstandard Work and Child Care Needs of Low-Income Parents” (with J.R. Lambert); Work, Family, Health, & Well-being (2005); and “The Organizational Stratification of Opportunities for Work-Life Balance: Addressing Issues of Equality and Social Justice in the Workplace” (with A. Haley-Lock). She is presently co-director of the Project on the Public Economy of Work. She received a BA in psychology from Eastern Michigan University, a MSW (social program evaluation) and a PhD in social work and social science (organizational psychology) from the University of Michigan.

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Doriane Miller

Doriane Miller

Director of the Center for Community Health and Vitality, a program of the Urban Health Initiative at the University of Chicago

Expertise: Internal medicine and primary care, community health, clinical quality improvement, behavioral health, minority health care, health care in underserved communities, clinical epidemiology
Workshops: Saturday, February 26, Understanding Community Health on the South Side

Doriane Miller is the inaugural director of the Center for Community Health and Vitality at the University of Chicago Medical Center, which aims to improve population health outcomes for residents on the South Side of Chicago. She was previously a faculty member of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement in Cambridge, MA. She served as associate division chief for general internal medicine at Stroger Hospital of Cook County, and as senior director for quality and clinical research of the Health Research and Educational Trust of the American Hospital Association. She was program vice president at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, where she was responsible for strategic planning and program design in the clinical quality improvement area.

Miller brings over 20 years of experience as a community-based primary care provider who has worked with under-served, minority populations, with a special interest in behavioral health. She served as medical director of the Maxine Hall Health Center of the San Francisco Department of Health, while also serving as assistant clinical professor of medicine at San Francisco General Hospital, University of California.

Miller received her MD from the University of Chicago. She completed a primary care internal medicine residency and a general medicine/clinical epidemiology fellowship at the University of California, San Francisco.

Rudy Nimocks

Rudy Nimocks

Director of Community Partnerships, the University of Chicago

Expertise: Grassroots organizing, urban violence and safety, community relations, Chicago’s South Side
Workshops: Saturday, February 12, Understanding Youth Violence

Rudy Nimocks is Director of Community Partnerships at the University of Chicago. In his role, he leads the University’s efforts to help grassroots groups revitalize neighboring communities. Nimocks transitioned to this University post from his role as the chief of the University of Chicago Police Department, where he oversaw 140 officers. Before joining the University, Nimocks was a homicide detective in the Chicago Police Department; he retired as the deputy superintendent of the department in 1989 after 28 years of service.

A resident of the nearby Woodlawn neighborhood for more than a half-century, Nimocks is committed to finding new ways to connect the University to the surrounding communities in Chicago’s South Side, to the benefit of both the University and the South Side. He is a longtime community advocate and continues to work with a multitude of organizations. Nimocks has served on the board of the Woodlawn New Communities Program and the Woodlawn Preservation and Investment Corporation.

Charles Payne

Charles Payne

The Frank P. Hixon Distinguished Service Professor in the School of Social Service Administration

Expertise: Urban education and school reform, social inequality, social change, modern African American history
Events: Thursday, January 20, 2011, Reforming Urban Schools at Scale

Charles M. Payne is the Frank P. Hixon Distinguished Service Professor in the School of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago, where he is also an affiliate of the Urban Education Institute. His interests include urban education and school reform, social inequality, social change, and modern African American history. He has authored several books, including I’ve Got the Light of Freedom: The Organizing Tradition in the Mississippi Civil Rights Movement (1995), which has won several awards.

Payne has been a member of the board of the Chicago Algebra Project, of the steering committee for the Consortium on Chicago School Research, the research advisory committee for the Chicago Annenberg Project, and on several editorial boards. He is the co-founder of the Duke Curriculum Project, which involves university faculty in the professional development of public school teachers, and the co-founder of the John Hope Franklin Scholars, which tries to better prepare high schoolers for college.

Payne was founding director of the Urban Education Project in Orange, New Jersey, a nonprofit community center that broadens educational experiences for urban youth. He has taught at Southern University, Williams College, Northwestern University, and Duke University; and he has earned several awards and chairs for teaching excellence.

Payne holds a bachelor’s degree in Afro-American studies from Syracuse University and a doctorate in sociology from Northwestern.

Bart Schultz

Bart Schultz

Senior Lecturer in the Humanities and Director of the Civic Knowledge Project at the University of Chicago

Expertise: Contemporary social, political, and ethical theory and its history; Chicago studies; gender/gay studies; happiness studies; critical race theory; philosophy of education; environmental studies; philosophy of social science
Courses: Winter 2012, Ethics, Happiness, and Poverty

Bart Schultz is Senior Lecturer in Humanities (philosophy), Special Programs Coordinator for the Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies, and Director of the Civic Knowledge Project in the University of Chicago’s Division of Humanities. He has taught in the College at the University of Chicago for 25 years, designing a wide range of Core courses, as well as courses on John Dewey, political philosophy, and happiness.

He has published widely in philosophy, and his books include Essays on Henry Sidgwick (1992), Henry Sidgwick: Eye of the Universe (2004), and Utilitarianism and Empire (2005). Through the Civic Knowledge Project, he has developed a public ethics program that involves multiple service learning opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students, enabling them to get involved, in educationally relevant ways, with the larger community of Chicago’s South Side. The CKP's Winning Words program is one of the only precollegiate philosophy programs in the U.S. for underserved urban youth.

Schultz is the recipient of several awards, including the American Philosophical Society’s Jacques Barzun Prize in Cultural History in 2004 and the Sustainable Endowments Institute “Champions of Sustainability in Communities” Award in 2009, and he serves on the editorial board of Utilitas, the leading scholarly journal of utilitarian studies. His research and teaching interests include contemporary social, political, and ethical theory and its history; Chicago studies; gender/gay studies, Victorian studies; happiness studies; critical race theory; philosophy of education; environmental studies; and philosophy of social science.

Earl Shorris

Earl Shorris

Founder of the Clemente Course in the Humanities and a National Humanities Medalist

Expertise: Humanities and poverty, social activism, Latino studies, public policy
Events: Thursday, October 21, 2010, Poverty and the Humanities

Earl Shorris is the founder of the Clemente Course in the Humanities, the award-winning global program that uses the humanities in antipoverty efforts. The Clemente Course is a tuition-free, college-level course for economically and educationally disadvantaged individuals aged 17 and older. The course is based on the premise that the insights and skills earned by studying the humanities can provide people with crucial tools for gaining control over their lives and becoming engaged in their communities. Now administered by Bard College, the Clemente Course is currently being taught at 17 sites in the United States, Canada, Mexico, and France.

Shorris is winner of the National Humanities Medal, a contributing editor of Harper’s Magazine since 1972, and a frequent commentator on National Public Radio. Shorris has had a distinguished career as a journalist, social critic, lecturer, and novelist. He was educated at the University of Chicago, which he entered as a scholarship student at the age of 13. He is the author of several novels and nonfiction books, including New American Blues: A Journey through Poverty to Democracy (1997) and The Politics of Heaven: America in Fearful Times (2007).

Sara Stoelinga

Sara Stoelinga

Director of Planning and Program Development at the Urban Education Institute at the University of Chicago

Expertise: Leadership, teacher evaluation, school reform policy and history, organizational change in schools
Courses: Autumn-Summer 2010-11, The Face of Urban Communities
Spring 2011, Poverty and Education in Chicago

Sara Ray Stoelinga is the director of planning and program development for the Urban Education Institute (UEI) at the University of Chicago. Stoelinga leads research projects at the Consortium on Chicago School Research (CCSR) and teaches within the Urban Teacher Education Program. She also supports evaluation research across UEI and participates in local and national engagement.

Stoelinga first joined UEI as an intern in 1995. She worked on the development and validation of the STEP assessment and engaged in research on school improvement. She became a research analyst at CCSR in 1999. After working for several years in education evaluation as an assistant research professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, Stoelinga returned in 2007 as a senior research analyst to CCSR.

Stoelinga is the author of Effective Teacher Leadership: Using Research to Inform and Reform (2008) and of Examining Effective Teacher Leadership: A Case Study Approach (2010).

Stoelinga received her BA and PhD in sociology from the University of Chicago. Her areas of expertise include leadership, teacher evaluation, school reform policy and history, and organizational change in schools.

Eric Whitaker

Eric Whitaker

Executive Vice President for Strategic Affiliations and Associate Dean for Community-Based Research, University of Chicago Medical Center

Expertise: Health care in urban and underserved communities, HIV/AIDS prevention, minority health, public health
Events: Wednesday, December 1, 2010, The Social Determinants of Urban Health

Eric E. Whitaker is Executive Vice President of Strategic Affiliations and Associate Dean of Community-based Research at the University of Chicago Medical Center (UCMC). He is responsible for leading UCMC’s Urban Health Initiative, linking the Medical Center’s mission of patient care, teaching, and research for the purpose of improving the health of South Side residents. Previously, he served as director of the Illinois Department of Public Health.

Whitaker was an attending physician in internal medicine at Cook County Hospital in Chicago and a member of its Collaborative Research Unit before joining the Medical Center. His research interests included HIV/AIDS prevention and minority health, particularly for black males. He helped found Project Brotherhood: A Black Men’s Clinic, a weekly clinic for African American men housed in Woodlawn Adult Health Center. In 2000, the project received the highest award accorded by the National Association of Public Hospitals and Health Systems.

Whitaker served as president of the American Medical Student Association; in this role, he testified twice before the U.S. Congress regarding national health insurance and minority health issues. In 2003, he was named one of Crain’s Chicago Business‘ Forty under Forty: Chicago’s rising stars in business and government.

Whitaker received his undergraduate degree in chemistry from Grinnell College, his master’s in public health from the Harvard School of Public Health, and his MD from the University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine.

Additional Experts

Malcolm Bush

Research Fellow
Expertise: Access to financial services for low-income populations, community development finance and community reinvestment policy and practice, community economic development, discrimination in the home-buying process, low-income youth’s connection to job markets in urban Braziland associated community development issues, predatory home mortgage and consumer lending
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Robert Chaskin

Associate Professor in the School of Social Service Administration; Research Fellow and Director of the International Programs, Chapin Hall Center for Children
Expertise: Youth development, community organizing, community-based practice, community development, community social organization, comprehensive community initiatives, family support, associations and nonprofits, philanthropy and social change, urban affairs
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Deborah Daro

Research Fellow, Chapin Hall Center
Expertise: Child abuse, prevention, child and family policy, early childhood and child welfare
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Colleen Grogan

Professor, School of Social Service Administration; Chair, Graduate Program in Health Administration and Policy; Co-Chair, Center for Health Administration Studies
Expertise: Medicaid policy, American government and public policy, comparative state-level policy and politics, the American welfare state, health policy, health politics, managed care, welfare reform
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Jeffrey Grogger

Irving Harris Professor in Urban Policy in the Harris School of Public Policy Studies
Expertise: Crime and labor policy, welfare reform
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Neil Guterman

Dean, Mose and Sylvia Firestone Professor, Social Service Administration
Expertise: Child abuse, neglect prevention
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Sydney L. Hans

Samuel Deutsch Professor in School of Social Service Administration
Expertise: Adolescent parenting, infant attachment to parents, parent-child relationships, women and violence, supportive interventions for families, impact of parental substance abuse on children, trauma and addicted women
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Ariel Kalil

Professor in the Harris School of Public Policy Studies
Expertise: Family structure, teenage parenting, inequality and poverty, job loss and unemployment, welfare reform, psychology, social policy
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Jens Ludwig

McCormick Foundation Professor of Social Service Administration, Law, and Public Policy in the School of Social Service Administration and the Harris School of Public Policy Studies
Expertise: Crime, education, housing policy, social policy
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Stuart Luppescu

Chief psychometrician at Chicago Consortium on School Research
Expertise: Educational measurement, language acquisition, Rasch Measurement, multi-level modeling of achievement data
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Willard Manning Jr.

Professor in the Harris School of Public Policy and the Department of Health Studies
Expertise: Econometrics, statistical analysis, health analysis, health policy, social policy
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Jeanne Marsh

George Herbert Jones Distinguished Service Professor, School of Social Service Administration
Expertise: Services for women, children, and families; child welfare; family reunification; parental substance abuse; women and substance abuse; substance abuse service delivery; program and policy development and evaluation; social work clinical practice; practice decision-making; social work education; evidence-based practice; treating women and families involved in the child welfare system
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Susan Mayer

Professor in the Harris School of Public Policy Studies
Expertise: Child and family policy, inequality and poverty, welfare reform, economic hardship, economic segregation, education policy
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Bruce Meyer

McCormick Foundation Professor in the Harris School of Public Policy Studies
Expertise: Tax policy, welfare policy, unemployment insurance, workers’ compensation, health care, social insurance
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Robert Michael

Eliakim Hastings Moore Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus and Dean Emeritus in the Harris School of Public Policy Studies
Expertise: Child and family policy, education policy, economic hardship, inequality and poverty, welfare reform, survey analysis, familial economic analysis, sexual practices
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Derek Neal

Professor and Chair in Economics and the Committee on Education
Expertise: Labor markets, labor inequality, Catholic schools, differences in family structure
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Harold Pollack

Helen Ross Professor in the School of Social Service Administration
Expertise: Child health, infant mortality prevention, childhood obesity, SIDS, second-hand smoke and children, ER usage, drug abuse and dependence among welfare recipients and pregnant women, HIV and hepatitis prevention efforts for injection drug users, harm reduction approaches to substance abuse treatment, poverty, drug abuse and dependence
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Melissa Roderick

Director, Chicago Postsecondary Transition Project and Co-Director, Consortium on Chicago School Research; Hermon Dunlap Smith Professor in the School of Social Service Administration
Expertise: Youth, development, minority adolescent development, education and child welfare, education policy, school reform, community schools, testing, urban high schools, drop outs, retention, summer programs
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Tina Rzepnicki

David and Mary Winton Green Professor in the School of Social Service Administration
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Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach

Assistant Professor in the Harris School of Public Policy
Expertise: Education policy, child health, food consumption
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Randall Schmidt

Clinical Professor of Law in the Law School
Expertise: Civil rights, affirmative action/anti-discrimination, employment discrimination, welfare
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Matthew Stagner

Executive Director and Senior Lecturer, Chapin Hall Center
Expertise: Child and family policy, children and adolescents, child welfare, marriage, social policy
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Mario Small

Professor in Sociology
Expertise: Urban poverty, social networking, social capital, inequality and culture
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Richard Taub

Paul Klapper Professor in Social Sciences; Chairman of the Committee on Human Development; Professor in Sociology
Expertise: Urban communities, rural communities, economic development, entrepreneurship, Indian studies
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Dexter Voisin

Associate Professor, School of Social Service Administration
Expertise: Urban African American and Latino youths; consequences of being exposed to violence; teenage pregnancy; substance use and misuse; AIDS prevention and interventions; anxiety, depression, aggression and PTSD symptoms and diagnoses
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